I've been using git for over a decade now and it's still an incomprehensible pile of misery that is a great way to accidentally overwrite your files

the sheer number of 'simple' operations which are incredibly hard or impossible to recover from if performed by accident. The number of common tasks that require several steps done in precisely the correct order. The command line interface that feels like pulling teeth to get comprehensible info from. The massively verbose help text that doesn't actually tell you how to do the common tasks you want to do. It's the worst

this is brought to you by: I have some local edits I wanted to put on a new branch, pull the remote changes, then merge them into my branch. I made a commit to main instead of new branch by accident, then in trying to move that commit to the new branch, seem to have made it disappear? who fucking knows. version control my ass

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I managed to find the commit with reflog and get it on a branch but gave up for now at the prospect of complicated merge conflict resolution.

@s0 the step from "doing basic stuff" to "understanding git and being a advanced user" it's quite high :/

@sandzwerg I just don’t use it often enough to *remember* the complex features, even if I’ve learned them before. It’s a big problem with the command line as a whole — I am an advanced user, but it’s not my job, and GUIs are far easier to remember with time away from use.

@s0 I'm not sure if a gui would have helped in this case. As least regarding the fixing stuff. I assume most git GUIs don't even support that. But yeah GUIs are far superior for seldomly used stuff and git is hard if you don't use it frequently.

@sandzwerg the git GUI I used regularly on Mac, Fork, would have been just fine. It’s not hard to show a list of all the commits, organisable & filterable by date, branch, etc, and provide commit, diff & merge interfaces.

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